Climate research

EUMEDCONNECT3 supports environmental and climatic research

Climate change is a global phenomenon with very specific local impacts. Water shortages, poor harvests and relentless desertification expose the Mediterranean region’s acute vulnerability to climatic extremes. Reviewing recent trends and projecting future scenarios allow scientists to assess the impact of climate change and to formulate recommendations to policy-makers and thus to make a tangible contribution towards sustainable development in the region. EUMEDCONNECT3 is key to the collaborative and data-intensive activity in which many Euro-Mediterranean environmental and climatic research projects are engaged.

The EUMEDCONNECT3 project:

  • Supports collaborative research between geographically dispersed research teams.
  • Enables scientists to harness the processing power from multiple distributed computer centres thanks to the powerful EUMEDGRID infrastructure.
  • Facilitates exchange of huge datasets.
  • Allows computer-intensive observations, simulations and modelling.
  • Provides access to remote databases with climate-related observational and geographic information system (GIS) data.
  • Allows researchers to address complex computational tasks, such as the creation and analysis of patterns of physical parameters.
  • Enhances multi-party dialogue, supporting scientific workgroup meetings with video-conferencing.
  • Enables scientists and policy-makers in the southern Mediterranean to respond to global challenges, whilst addressing local concerns.

Find out more about how EUMEDCONNECT3 supports regional climate change research in the case studies below:

​Case studies

Mapping the landscape, managing the future: EUMEDCONNECT3 and Agadir
How the network supports research aimed at contributing to sustainable land management in Morocco.

CIRCE: e-infrastructures help save the Mediterranean
This case study describes how EUMEDCONNECT2 supports collaborative research between 64 geographically dispersed research teams participating in this climate change and impact study.

 

Photo by Wolfgang Hasselmann on Unsplash